The University of Arizona Healthcare Partnership’s Participation in Cease Smoking today (CS2Day), Funded through the Physicians’ Institute for Excellence in Medicine: The Right Message at the Right Time

Mary E. Gilles, Claire Brown, Jing Su, Robert L. Addleton, Adele B. Cohen, Louise J Strayer, Lee Sechrest

Abstract


Background: University of Arizona HealthCare Partnership (HCP) provided continuing medical education (CME) courses to physicians and healthcare professionals across Arizona to improve the treatment of nicotine addiction through a grant from the Physicians’ Institute for Excellence in Medicine, a partner in Cease Smoking Today (CS2Day). This article describes the content, delivery, and outcomes of 2 courses and compares the impact of longer and shorter programs.

Methods: Healthcare provider participants (n = 290) attended either a 4-hour Basic Tobacco Intervention Skills a-tion for Medical and Allied Health Professionals or a 1-hour Tobacco Dependence Treatment Continuing Education Program. Program evaluations were completed by 219 participants (76%). Pre- and posttests administered at the 4-hour program  (n = 44) measured satisfaction, knowledge and skills, and ce levels in assessment, intervention, and treatment of nicotine dependence. Follow-up surveys measured intended implementation of interventions and treatments. Evaluations of the 1-hour program measured satisfaction, knowledge, and intentions to change practice (n = 175). Follow-up surveys measured intended implementation of interventions and treatments.

Results: Participants in both programs reported high levels of program satisfaction and intentions to change practice to effectively address the prevention and treatment of tobacco dependence as recommended by the PHS Guidelines (2000). Participants who attended the 4-hour program reported ant gains in self-ce to assess and administer brief interventions (not measured in the 1-hour program). Results on the knowledge items were higher among the participants in the 4-hour program than those in the 1-hour program, as were results on intent to incorporate new interventions and treatments to ameliorate tobacco use. Follow-up questionnaires demonstrated sustained incorporation of interventions and treatments at 6 weeks postprogram.

Conclusion: Participants from both programs reported gains in knowledge and skills in implementing brief tobacco depen-dence treatment interventions. Time was as a primary constraint in follow-up surveys regarding the incorporation of interventions and treatments into routine practice.


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